Cartridge prices going up again?

March 9, 2011

Oil, gas, and food prices in the last few months have been going up and for the short term at least the question remains, how high will they go?  The one thing rising prices have in common is the rising price in oil.  With rising oil you have rising transportation and manufacturing prices.  The question remains how will this effect cartridge prices for printers?

If you look back at the last time oil and gas shot up like they are now, that summer, prices for cartridge raised on average about 15-20%.  The prices that people see today when they buy an HP, Lexmark, or other brand name cartridge are the prices that were an effect of oil prices hitting $140 a barrel.  People may ask why, but here are the factors to remember.

  1. Cartridges are made out of plastic, plastic is made out of oil.  And while the brand name companies may lock in their component prices for a while, dramatic increases like we saw can not be avoided.
  2. Transportation cost rose up.  Since there are very few cartridges made in North America (there are a few plants in Mexico), all the cartridges must be transported in from Asia.
  3. Brand name cartridge companies like HP, Lexmark, Canon and the others are greedy.  Remember that the price of oil did drop down, and for a few years was below $70 a barrel, but prices for OEM cartridges did not go down.

So the question remains, what will happen with cartridge prices this year with oil going up?  I would be almost willing to bet that if oil stays at current prices or even increases to say $120 a barrel, OEM cartridge prices could see an increase in prices of an average of 10-15%.  This means that a HP 56 cartridge that cost $23.99 today could end up costing around $27-28 and an HP 42X toner cartridge could go from $249 up to $260-285.  I am sure we will find out by the end of June if the prices are going up or not.  To be honest I would be shocked if prices did not go up.

Now as for myself and for O-ink, we almost hope for a price increase from the OEM’s.  If they raise prices by say a flat $2-4 per inkjet and $10-25 per laser cartridge, that would mean that our prices would be $1.50-3.50 cheaper for inkjets in addition to the savings we already offer.  For lasers it would be around $9-$22 cheaper.  The reason I am not saying the 2-4 range or 10-25 range is I would expect our shipping cost to go up.

Please keep in mind, I hate high gas prices.  However, the last time this happened, I actually guessed about 5% lower on the price increases that happened.  I do hope I am wrong.

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Fire Sale on Replacement Brother LC41 Cartridges

September 17, 2010

Due to an overstock of Replacement Brother LC41 cartridges, we are setting the prices on fire to move them out.

These are high quality remanufactured Brother LC41 cartridges, all colors. 1 year satisfaction guarantee (see website for all details).

Get all four colors for $16.00. That is a savings of over $9.
Black for $5.99
Each Color for $4.25

Sale ends Oct. 31st.  No Coupon Required


Looking for a new printer?

May 28, 2010

If you are looking to buy a new printer or replace on you have, here is one to look at.

Canon Pixma MX860

I have found it for around 130 to 150 dollars.  It does everything you want, wifi, duplexing, wired, duplex scanning, photos, individual cartridges, fax, copy, and all the bells and whistles.

We also have the replacement cartridges available now.


New Products Available

April 1, 2010

We at O-ink are happy to announce that we have added 11 new replacement cartridges to growing list of inkjet and laser cartridges we offer.

  1. HP 60 Series Replacements: We now have both the standard and XL versions of both the cartridges available.
  2. HP 901 Series Replacements: We now have both the standard and XL black cartridges along with the color cartridge available.
  3. Brother LC61 Replacements:  All four colors are available.  These are not generic/third party cartridges, these are empty Brother cartridges that have been cleaned, inspected, and filled.

All of our cartridges are filled the the full weight of the OEM’s cartridges and carry our one year guarantee.  If you have any questions or need to place an order just look us up at www.oinkinkstore.com


Lexmark gets sued over Return Program technology

March 30, 2010

When Lexmark came out with the Return Program Inkjet Cartridge, quite a few people in the inkjet remanufacturing industry took note.  The Return Program inkjet cartridges have a built in kill feature that prevents a user or company from refilling and reusing that cartridge.  For Lexmark this is a great money move, because it forces people to buy their cartridges, which means more money from them.  Currently, from what I can tell, there is around 12 or so inkjet models that are Return Program Cartridges.

No one has found a way to get around the electronic aspect of the cartridge.  Now for Lexmark everything is going all good and that, but there was a small problem that arose.  Apparently, Lexmark took the kill feature that they use in their Return Program Cartridges from another company.  On Feburary 22nd, 2010, Advanced Cartridge Technologies (we will call them ACT to save on time) sued Lexmark for patent infrindgement (link).  Apparently ACT has three patent’s that they claim Lexmark is using without permission.

So how does this affect the user, nothing yet.  However, if Lexmark loses (remember court battles can take years), there are two possible outcomes.  1.  This could drive Lexmark under.  ACT is seeking Triple damages.  If Lexmark closes, there goes the supply of cartridges.  (I doubt this could or will happen, but there is that possiblity.)

2.  Lexmark stops the Return Program for Inkjets.  Lexmark has in place for all of their Return Program Inkjet Cartridges a replacement cartridge that technically be refilled called the “A” version.  The problem is that these cartridges cost around $2 more and are hard to find in a retail store.  The lawsuit could stop the sales of Return Program cartridges and force consumers to spend more on already expensive inkjet cartridges.

We are years away from this lawsuit affecting anyone, but it will interesting to see what happens.


Holiday Season Photos – How to get the most for your money

November 11, 2009

With the holiday season upon us now, this is one of the prime times to get the printer working into overdrive.  You have holiday letters, holiday photos, family photos, pet photos, etc . . . so the question becomes, how do you spend less money on your Holiday Printing?

  1. Preview, Preview, Preview – Sounds simple, but more often than not, people do not preview what they print prior to printing.  Reading over the letter or looking closely at the photo prior to printing can help avoid spelling your kid’s new pet’s name wrong.  With photos, make sure that you want it printed like it is.
  2. Test print first – Before you print the final copy of anything, print off one or two copies on regular paper on the lowest quality and then inspect them.  Does it fit right, do the colors look okay (remember draft mode of quick mode will look faded), do I want to make any changes?  These are the questions to as prior to printing the final copy.
  3. Select the right paper – Believe it or not if you tell your printer through it’s properties that you are using glossy photo paper instead of matte or copy paper, it makes a difference.  Try to chose the paper that is closest to what you have.  Also, make sure you buy the right paper, Laser Paper does not absorb the ink correctly, unlike Inkjet Paper does (for photos).
  4. Make sure you have enough ink – Holiday Season is one time I stress to our customers to have one extra set on hand for their printer.  Finding out at 10 o’clock at night that you do not have enough ink for the family photo that is for the Christmas party tomorrow is never a good thing.
  5. Print in spurts – Do you have 100 letters you send out or 100 photos you include with the letters?  Do not print them all at once.  Printing in spurts of 10-25 can save you a lot of hassle.  If you run out of ink and your printer still keeps printing (Certain HP and Lexmarks), it is much easier to reprint 5 pages instead of 50.  Also, the printers need to cool down.  Inkjet printers are not designed for heavy use, so leaving them set for 5-10 minutes between prints is good.
  6. Take your photos somewhere to print them off – During the holiday season certain places have specials on printing photos for you.  The magic size is 5 x 7, most of the time prints smaller than that size are cheaper to have someone print for you.  While prints larger than that are cheaper to do at home.  But this depends on your printer as well.  Certain printers just cost more than others to run.

I hope this helps you with your printing needs and if you need any ink for those printers, look us up at www.oinkinkstore.com


IE not printing correctly – what is to blame?

September 14, 2009

Had a customer with an unusual problem a couple weeks ago.  They could print from My Documents, but anything from IE (Version 8) would only print the header and footer, no body.  Do you know how hard that is to research?  Well, here is what I found.

  1. Check your add-ons.  Some add-ons can cause problems with printing in IE, so it is recommended to turn them all off, and then try printing.  If it works, then starting turning them on and printing.  Repeat process until it doesn’t work or they are all turned on.
  2. Do you have MSIA installed?  MSIA stands for Microsoft Software Inventory Analyzer.  Apparently when this is installed it causes the printing to not work correctly.  It is not required for anything so uninstalling it  causes no problem (According to Microsoft)
  3. Double and triple check the cartridges.  This was my customers problem.  We could print in black/white mode, but once we turned the color on it failed, why?  Her cartridge was shorted and empty.  It should have still printed what it could with the black cartridge, but for whatever reason it didn’t.  Darn Lexmarks 🙂 (She has a Lexmark X75)

Hopefully if you run into this problem it is an easy fix.  Happy Printing.